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Citizen Perceptions of Procedural Fairness and the Moderating Roles of 'Belief in a Just World' and 'Public Service Motivation' in Public Hiring
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Citizen Perceptions of Procedural Fairness and the Moderating Roles of 'Belief in a Just World' and 'Public Service Motivation' in Public Hiring

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This article expands our knowledge of how variation in public administrative processes affects citizen perceptions of procedural fairness (CPPF). Focusing on a specific administrative process—the selection and hiring process—we use a survey experimental design among 823 US citizens and examine the effect of a public hiring process involving the appearance of advocacy from an applicant's social contacts on CPPF. Moreover, we theoretically and empirically examine the moderating effects of two psychological constructs: ‘belief in a just world’ and ‘public service motivation’. We find that citizens rate the procedural fairness of a hiring situation much lower when the situation appears to be influenced by an applicant's social contacts. However, citizens who report stronger ‘belief in a just world’ have less concern with a hiring process marked by advocacy, whereas citizens with higher levels of ‘public service motivation’ have more concern.
Pedersen, M. J., Stritch, J. M., & Taggart, G. (2017). Citizen Perceptions of Procedural Fairness and the Moderating Roles of 'Belief in a Just World' and 'Public Service Motivation' in Public Hiring. Public Administration, 95(4), 874-894. DOI: 10.1111/padm.12353
Author(s) Mogens Jin Pedersen, SFI
Justin M. Stritch
Gabel Taggart
Publication date 18.12.2017
Published in Public Administration
Language English
Department Social Policy and Welfare

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